Temperatures in Europe have increased at more than twice the global average

Temperatures in Europe have increased at more than twice the global average over the past 30 years – the highest of any continent in the world. This includes the Arctic which is the fastest warming region on Earth.... READ MORE

Devastating floods in Nigeria claim over 600 lives

Intense floods like those inundating Nigeria in recent weeks are expected to become more frequent as the globe continues to warm under a thickening blanket of greenhouse gases.... READ MORE

Greenland 8°C warmer in September

In what would be the start to a series of anomalous temperature spikes in the autumnal shoulder season, the temperature at Greenland's highest point was above freezing on Sept 3--the first time ever recorded in... READ MORE

ARCTIC OCEAN ACIDIFYING 4X FASTER

New research found that rapid melting of sea ice means the Arctic Ocean is particularly vulnerable to acidification.... READ MORE

HURRICANE IAN MAKES LANDFALL IN FLORIDA

Having already knocked out power throughout Cuba, Hurricane Ian is crashing into the western coast of Florida with its disastrous extreme trifecta of storm surges reaching 18 feet, torrential rains unleashing up to 24... READ MORE

COUNTDOWN

CO2 Budget Depletion

ARCTIC CLIMATE CHANGE

AMPLIFIES A TOP GLOBAL RISK:

The WEF Global Risks Report Survey 2022 found leaders rank failure of climate action as the number one long-term threat to the world. The Arctic plays a key role in regulating the world’s climate and weather regimes - but it is warming at least three times faster than the rest of the world. The consequences go far beyond its borders!

NEW - Climate Vulnerability and the Arctic

Arctic warming amplifies existing threats to climate vulnerable countries around the world. Our new campaign focuses on regions including Africa, Asia, Europe, the Pacific, North America and the Caribbean and highlights how Arctic warming is related to global risks such as droughts, wildfires, food and water insecurity, sea level rise, cyclones and hurricanes.

What happens in the Arctic really doesn't stay there.
Is your country climate vulnerable?

NEW - Socio-Economic Indicators

There is growing scientific evidence that climate change leads to more severe, and more frequent, extreme weather events in most parts of the planet. These extreme events, coupled with rising atmospheric temperatures and moisture across the world, are some of the most obvious manifestations of climate change. It is well documented that increasingly hot and humid conditions – as measured by heat stress – adversely affect human health and work productivity. This has a negative impact on people’s livelihoods and wider economies.

See the indicators

SDGs and the Arctic

The Arctic plays a bigger role in the success of the 17 SDGs than has ever been considered. Loss of Arctic sea ice and snow cover drives global heating by 25-40%.

Warming in the Arctic causes impacts that extend far beyond its borders and carries significant economic costs. To achieve the SDGs we need the Arctic.
The Arctic & the SDGs

The Arctic is a climate early-warning system, and its alarms are flashing red:

The latest analysis paints a picture of rapidly unfolding environmental breakdown as a direct result of increases in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Extreme warming, rapid sea ice loss, Greenland melt, and permafrost thaw are all triggering a cascade of risks in the rest of the world.
See the risk data

Arctic warming unleashes socio-economic risks across the world:

it contributes to rising sea levels, higher global temperatures and increasingly extreme weather. These physical changes worsen food and water insecurity, supply chain disruption, disease, heat stress and damage to infrastructure and ecosystems. Estimates of global socio-economic and ecological impacts linked with Arctic warming put a price tag of tens of billions USD per year over the coming decades.
Read global risks

Business and government must lead the way:

Comprehensive solutions exist to address climate change by cutting emissions and adapting to a changing climate. But there are no silver bullets or shortcuts in the fight against climate change. Citizen and consumer behaviour change alone will not be enough: state and economic actors will need to show real leadership and innovation.
Read solutions

Arctic breakdown is central to WEF’s 2022 agenda:

Arctic breakdown elevates risk far beyond its borders. The WEF meeting in Davos is a critical opportunity to align government policies and business strategies to collectively act to address climate change.
Read the report

ARCTIC RISK INDICATORS

The following gauges show up-to-date data regarding key indicators in the Arctic. These indicators clearly point to the crisis at hand.

The Arctic (80°N+) Surface Temperature
12 % days
in 2022 are above 90th percentile of 1981-2010
39 days
in 2022 are above 90th percentile of 1981-2010
Worldwide number of disasters
334 disasters
more events in 2021 in comparison to 1970s
252 disasters
more events in 2021 in comparison to 1980s
169 disasters
more events in 2021 in comparison to 1990s
Arctic Sea Ice Extent
1.9 Million km²
below 1981-2010 average on 24-Oct-2022
0.72 Million mi²
below 1981-2010 average on 24-Oct-2022
Arctic Wildfire emissions
12.32 megatonnes CO₂e
CO₂e emissions in 2022 so far
Greenland rate of ice loss
4.5 hundred thousands l/s
on average in 1986-2015
4.5 tons per second
on average in 1986-2015
Arctic Air Quality (PM2.5)
1.38 microgram per cubic meter
on 25-Nov-2022