A “meteorological hammer” drops on the USA

Europe is already in the wrath of an Arctic blast, but a "meteorological hammer" is about to drop on the USA as well, gripping all but the westernmost regions in days or weeks of below-normal temperatures, supercell... READ MORE

Record temperatures in northern Alaska

The most northern town in Alaska, Utqiaġvik (71°N) reached 40°F/4.5°C on Monday, more than 37°F above the average high temperature for this time of year. Monday's temperature not only surpassed the previous... READ MORE

Temperatures in Europe have increased at more than twice the global average

Temperatures in Europe have increased at more than twice the global average over the past 30 years – the highest of any continent in the world. This includes the Arctic which is the fastest warming region on Earth.... READ MORE

Devastating floods in Nigeria claim over 600 lives

Intense floods like those inundating Nigeria in recent weeks are expected to become more frequent as the globe continues to warm under a thickening blanket of greenhouse gases.... READ MORE

Greenland 8°C warmer in September

In what would be the start to a series of anomalous temperature spikes in the autumnal shoulder season, the temperature at Greenland's highest point was above freezing on Sept 3--the first time ever recorded in... READ MORE

COUNTDOWN

CO2 Budget Depletion

GREENLAND MELTING MEANS RISING SEA LEVELS

The Risk

A WARMER ARCTIC UNDERMINES ITS VAST ICE SHEETS. Air temperatures within the Arctic Circle are rising approximately four times faster than the global average. 
As a result, melting land ice and snow are draining more and more into the global ocean.

SEE THE DATA

MELTING ICE SHEETS MEAN HIGHER SEAS The Greenland Ice Sheet contains the equivalent of 7.4 metres of sea level rise. It is now the largest contributor to global sea level rise at up to 1.4 mm per year and Greenland’s ongoing deglaciation will massively disrupt coastal communities across the world.

SEE THE DATA

THE MASSIVE GREENLAND ICE SHEET IS RETREATING. Within the last three decades, Greenland has lost almost five trillion tonnes of ice equivalent to 14 millimetres in sea-level rise. Losses from other ice masses and thermal expansion of the ocean doubles this figure. But this is just the beginning: Greenland ice was in balance with climate in the 1990s and its ice deficit is now accelerating.

SEE THE DATA

IPCC FINDINGS

The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is the world’s most authoritative source on climate change. It reviews all published literature to provide comprehensive and objective scientific information.

GREENLAND MELTING UNLOCKS A FROZEN-WATER STOREHOUSE

The vast Greenland Ice Sheet is three times the area of France and acts as a massive reservoir storing the world’s frozen freshwater. Since 2005, it has been in severe deficit, losing on average 243 billion tonnes of ice every year, equivalent to 486,000 fully loaded supertankers dumping that melt directly into the ocean

Global mean sea level rise has increased by 20 cm (±5 cm) between 1901 and 2018 but over half of this has occurred in the last two decades. The world’s oceans have been rising at a mean rate in excess of 4±0.5 mm per year since 2007.

Global mean sea level rise is projected to approach 2 metres by 2100 and 5 metres by 2150 under a very high GHG emissions scenario.

Many impacts due to already committed greenhouse gas emissions have become irreversible for centuries to millennia, especially structural changes in ocean circulation, ice sheets and global sea level.

  • Greenland ice melt is the leading source of global sea level rise.
  • Over the next 80 years, the dwindling Greenland Ice Sheet is expected to add between at least 90±50 mm and 32±17 mm to sea-level rise for high and low emissions scenarios, respectively.
  • Rising seas could be far higher if the projected pace of Greenland’s deglaciation exceeds expectations - which has been the actual reality for the last four IPCC reports.
  • Fresh water from the melting Greenland Ice Sheet is expected to disrupt the main North Atlantic thermohaline current, likely intensifying storms impacting northwestern Europe and the North Atlantic.

RAPID ICE SHEET MELT

DATA SOURCE

Charts best viewed in landscape mode, rotate your phone to explore this chart.

Greenland''s cumulative mass balance and its trend after removing annual seasonality. Derived from MB_SMB_D_BMB.csv file from datasource available at PROMICE.

WATSON RIVER

DATA SOURCE

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Discharge data from the Watson River were gathered for the Programme for Monitoring of the Greenland Ice Sheet (PROMICE) by GEUS (2014-present), and before that by the University of Copenhagen (2006-2013) Derived from data product available from PROMICE. .

SURFACE MELT

DATA SOURCE

Charts best viewed in landscape mode, rotate your phone to explore this chart.

Greenland''s daily surface melt extent data. Derived from datasource available at NSIDC''s Greenland Today Melt Analysis data spreadsheet.

ARCTIC RISK INDICATORS

The following gauges show up-to-date data regarding key indicators in the Arctic. These indicators clearly point to the crisis at hand.

The Arctic (66°N+) Surface Temperature
10 % days
in 2023 are above 90th percentile of 1981-2010
2 days
in 2023 are above 90th percentile of 1981-2010
Worldwide number of disasters
265 disasters
more events in 2022 in comparison to 1970s
183 disasters
more events in 2022 in comparison to 1980s
100 disasters
more events in 2022 in comparison to 1990s
Arctic Sea Ice Extent
1,053,999 km²
below 1981-2010 average on 24-Jan-2023
406,949 mi²
below 1981-2010 average on 24-Jan-2023
Arctic Wildfire emissions
-0.00 megatonnes CO₂e
CO₂e emissions in 2023 so far
Greenland rate of ice loss
4.5 hundred thousands l/s
on average in 1986-2015
4.5 tons per second
on average in 1986-2015
Arctic Air Quality (PM2.5)
1.71 microgram per cubic meter
on 25-Jan-2023