Cyclone Michaung wreaks havoc in Southern India

Cyclone Michaung wreaks havoc in Southern India as it intensifies into a severe storm. Warmer oceans are the primary reason for the storm which is closely linked to Arctic Sea ice... READ MORE

Confirmed: 2023 set to be the warmest year on record

The WMO provisional State of the Global Climate report confirms that 2023 is set to be the warmest year on record, regardless of the final two months of... READ MORE

Colossal Antarctic iceberg, five times larger than New York City, breaks free and drifts away from region

On November 24th, scientists from the Bristish Antarctic Survey (BAS) were astonished to observe an iceberg measuring around 4,000 square kilometers (more than twice the size of Greater London) drifting away from the... READ MORE

World surpasses critical warming threshold for the first time

On November 17th, global temperatures reached 2.07°C above pre-industrial levels for the first time on record.... READ MORE

Unexpected disintegration of ice shelves in North Greenland

Alarm bells ringing as rapid disintegration and weakening of ice shelves in North Greenland is observed!... READ MORE

COUNTDOWN

CO2 Budget Depletion

ARCTIC BREAKDOWN IS A RISK MULTIPLIER FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

THE RISK

ARCTIC WARMING CAN CAUSES EXTREME WEATHER ACROSS THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE. The catastrophic and costly storms, heat waves and other extreme weather hammering the world’s cities and regions have been linked to changes in the rapidly warming Arctic. Between 2010 and 2019, record-breaking storms, floods, and other natural disasters were the costliest in modern history with losses totaling US$2.98 trillion.

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SOME OF THE WORLD’S MOST POPULATED PLACES ARE ON THE SHORES OF RISING OCEANS. Seas are rising faster now than over any century in the past 3,000 years. Coastline flooding of low-lying cities and regions as well as devastating coastal erosion will worsen and happen more often in the decades ahead.
If all of Antarctica were to melt, global sea level rise could rise about 58m. Some of this, we now know, is unavoidable, even without further emissions–and if we succeed in keeping global temperatures under 1.5C (Naughten, Holland & De Rydt, 2023).

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IPCC FINDINGS

The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is the world’s most authoritative source on climate change. It reviews all published literature to provide comprehensive and objective scientific information.

ARCTIC MELT-WATER UPS THE RISK OF FLOODED COASTAL CITIES

Heavy rains, growing worse since the 1950s, will continue to get 7% more intense with every 1°C of global warming, according to the UN’s latest special report on climate science, and devastating category 4 or 5 cyclones will happen more often. Cities are projected to suffer more frequent and intense heatwaves, as well as heavier rains and runoff. In the world’s many coastal cities, sea level rise and storm surges will combine with more intense rains and storms to make severe flooding far more common. Elsewhere, heatwaves and droughts are expected to occur together more often, including in crop-producing areas.

  • Heavy rains around the world have been getting increasingly worse and more frequent since the 1950s, and strong tropical cyclones have occurred more often and intensified more rapidly over the past four decades.
  • Droughts are happening more often and intensifying in some regions.
  • Unprecedented extreme storms and other never-seen-before weather events will happen more often in the future.
  • Sea levels around the world are expected to rise by up to 0.55 metres by 2100. If carbon emissions are reduced, oceans will climb 0.44-0.76 meters, but if not, they’re expected to rise 0.63-1.01 metres.

EXTREME WEATHER EVENTS

DATA SOURCE

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Science finds close links between Arctic warming and extreme weather across the Northern Hemisphere. Devastating and costly cyclones, heatwaves, droughts and other weather disasters across North America, Europe and Asia have all been tied to the effects of super-charged Arctic warming.

SEA LEVEL RISE

DATA SOURCE

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Melting glaciers and ice sheets, including those in the Arctic, are the main reason sea levels increased between 2006 and 2018. Oceans, which rose by 20 millimetres (0.79 inches) between 1901 and 2018, are now rising by almost four millimetres (0.16 inches) per year. Higher oceans, combined with more intense storms and rain, are expected to cause more catastrophic flooding in coastal cities around the world.

ARCTIC RISK INDICATORS

The following gauges show up-to-date data regarding key indicators in the Arctic. These indicators clearly point to the crisis at hand.

Greenland rate of ice loss
13 million l/s
on average
13 million tonnes/s
on average
Arctic Sea Ice Extent
485,500 km²
below 1981-2010 average on 12-Apr-2024
187,451 mi²
below 1981-2010 average on 12-Apr-2024
Arctic Amplification
4 times
faster than global average
Arctic 66N+ Wildfire emissions
0.00 megatonnes CO₂e
CO₂e emissions in 2024 so far
Arctic Air Quality (PM2.5)
3.69 microgram per cubic meter
on 13-Apr-2024
Global mean Sea Level
3.4mm/year
since 1993